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The most Sustainable Energy
is Saved Energy.

SDI performance specialists assess your entire building as a system. Our certified technicians look at building’s air leakage, duct leakage, insulation barriers, heating and cooling systems, windows, and most importantly the combustion appliances in the home. Our goal is to improve your home’s performance by creating a more energy efficient and healthy home for years to come.

 

Insulation

Block Heat Loss in the winter and Heat Gain in the summer.

Insulation keeps your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer. There are several common types of insulation — fiberglass (in both batt and blown forms), cellulose, rigid foam board, and spray foam. Reflective insulation (or radiant barrier) is another product which can help save energy in hot, sunny climates.

When correctly installed with air sealing, each type of insulation can deliver comfort and lower energy bills during the hottest and coldest times of the year.

Insulation performance is measured by R-value — its ability to resist heat flow. Higher R-values mean more insulating power. Different R-values are recommended for walls, attics, basements and crawlspaces, depending on your area of the country. Insulation works best when air is not moving through or around it. So it is very important to seal air leaks before installing insulation to ensure that you get the best performance from the insulation.

Learn All About SDI Insulation Services

Duct Leakage

It could be your ducts.

A duct system that is properly sealed & insulated can make your home comfortable, energy efficient, and safer. Making improvements to your duct system can:

Improve Comfort

Sealing and insulating ducts can help with common comfort problems, such as rooms that are too hot in the summer or too cold in the winter.

Enhance Indoor Air Quality

Fumes from household and garden chemicals, insulation particles, and dust can enter your duct system, aggravating asthma and allergy problems. Sealing ducts can help improve indoor air quality by reducing the risk of pollutants entering ducts and circulating through your home.

Promote Safety

During normal operation, gas appliances such as water heaters, clothes dryers, and furnaces release combustion gases (like carbon monoxide) through their venting systems. Leaky ductwork in your heating and cooling system may cause “backdrafting,” where these gases are drawn back into the living space, rather than expelled to the outdoors. Sealing leaks can reduce this risk.

Save Money

Leaky ducts can reduce heating and cooling system efficiency by as much as 20 percent. Sealing and insulating ducts increases efficiency, lowers your energy bills, and can often pay for itself in energy savings. Plus, if you’re planning to install new heating and cooling equipment, a well-designed and sealed duct system may allow you to downsize to a smaller, less costly heating and cooling system that will provide better dehumidification.

Protect the Environment

When power plants burn fossil fuels to make electricity, they release greenhouse gases. By sealing ductwork and using less energy at home, you can help reduce these emissions and fight global warming.

 

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SIMPLE STEPS TO IMPROVING DUCT PERFORMANCE 

Because ducts are often concealed in walls, ceiling, attics, and basements, repairing them can be difficult. But there are things that you can do to improve duct performance in your house. We start by sealing air leaks using mastic sealant or metal tape and insulating all the ducts that we can access. We never use duct tape, as it is not long-lasting. Also, we make sure that the connections at vents and registers are well-sealed where they meet the floors, walls, and ceiling. These are common locations to find leaks and disconnected ductwork.

Air Leakage

Drafts? Can’t keep your home heated?

Air leakage occurs when outside air enters and conditioned air leaves your house uncontrollably through cracks and openings.  During cold or windy weather, too much air may enter the house. When it’s warmer and less windy, not enough air may enter, which can result in poor indoor air quality. Air leakage also contributes to moisture problems that can affect occupants’ health and the structure’s durability. An added benefit is that sealing cracks and openings reduces drafts and cold spots, improving comfort.

Sealing the shell of your home—outer walls, doors, ceiling, windows and floors—from air leaks is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to increase comfort and energy efficiency. Sealing air leaks reduces drafts, controls moisture, keeps out pollutants and improves overall comfort.

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Many air leaks and drafts are easy to find because they are easy to feel, like those around doors and windows. However, hiring a contractor like SDI Insulation to perform a Blower Door test, which pressurizes and depressurizes your home to measure air leakage, can help you find many of your home’s hidden leaks.

Heating & Air Conditioning

Get smaller, better, cheaper.

A typical California home loses up to half of its heating and cooling energy before it even reaches you—through leaky ducts and poor insulation.

New furnaces and air conditioning equipment can be smaller and more effective after you seal and insulate your home. You won’t be leaking conditioned air and your house will retain the heat or cool better. Be sure to ask your contractor to “right size” new HVAC equipment. That saves you money now on your purchase—a smaller unit—and later on your utility bills. You’ll also increase comfort—no longer will some rooms be too hot while others are too cold.

New furnaces and air conditioning equipment can be smaller and more effective after you seal and insulate your home. You won’t be leaking conditioned air and your house will retain the heat or cool better. Be sure to ask your contractor to “right size” new HVAC equipment. That saves you money now on your purchase—a smaller unit—and later on your utility bills. You’ll also increase comfort—no longer will some rooms be too hot while others are too cold.

Installing a programmable thermostat allows you to only run your furnace or air conditioner when you need it, at the temperature you want without having to constantly monitor it. Even if your heating and cooling units are relatively new, there may be practical alternatives that can really cut your costs.

Furnaces

Furnaces fired by fossil fuel—generally natural gas in California—can lose up to 35% of the energy they burn in exhaust up their flue. But, new furnaces can be highly efficient and may still be the most cost-effective choice for your home.

Sealed combustion/condensing furnaces can achieve 97% efficiency and are environmentally friendly. They contain a second heat exchanger to extract additional heat from the gases. They’re more expensive to buy, but more economical to run.

The efficiency of furnaces is measured by “annual fuel utilization efficiency” (AFUE), which must be posted on the unit. Be sure to discuss AFUEs with your contractor—those 92% or higher will be the most energy efficient but capacity size matters too!

Windows

You can insulate your windows too.

Window glass first came into use in the 1600s, and was typically just one thin pane of glass. On a cold day, the cold glass surface inside pulls heat away from your body, so you feel chilly, even in a sweater with the thermostat at 70 degrees. And during the summer, even a standard double-paned window allows about 75% of the sun’s heat into your home.

Fortunately, window technology has come a long way in just a few decades. In today’s world, you have a lot of choices in selecting windows that can save 7-15% energy, according to the DOE. In fact, the home energy assessment tests are so sensitive that you can identify the leakiest windows and replace just the worst offenders, if you choose. Plus, new windows add security, noise reduction and better aesthetics. (Note that sealing and insulating your house before you replace windows will make your new windows even more effective.)

If you decide to install new windows, there are many good choices, one of which will probably fit your budget. New windows come with Energy Star ratings, so you will easily be able to compare their energy efficiency, as well as their cost.

 SDI Home & Building Performance